received 1075539350804195received 1075539350804195

The following concept has long persisted in the collective consciousness of supporters of the U.S. men’s national team: “What if? What if we just hired one of the best soccer coaches in the world to coach our soccer team? That would be what puts us over the top.” It has sort of already occurred once.

A revitalized and rejuvenated Germany advanced to extra time in the 2006 World Cup semifinals under the direction of Jurgen Klinsmann. The former star of the national team gave a program that seemed to be constrained by tradition new ideas and a new viewpoint.

Following the competition, both the US and the fans agreed that he should be the team captain for the USMNT. Federation of Soccer. However, to nearly everyone’s dismay, negotiations finally broke down, and Bob Bradley was named the temporary and subsequently full-time coach.

Bradley then guided the team through what was arguably its most prosperous modern era: winning the Gold Cup final against Mexico for the first time in 2007, defeating all-conquering Spain in the Confederations Cup semifinals in 2009, and emerging victorious from a World Cup group that featured England in 2010. But Klinsmann did eventually arrive, taking Bradley’s place in 2011.

At the 2014 World Cup, the team advanced out of its group and then had to cling on for dear life to defeat Belgium in extra time. After the United States lost to Jamaica in the Gold Cup semifinals in 2015, and after an unexpected run to the Copa America semifinals in 2016 bought him some more time, Klinsmann was sacked later that year with the United States at the bottom of the World Cup qualifying rankings.

Therefore, it wouldn’t be entirely incorrect to believe that, while this technique was incorrect in practice, it was correct in theory. As seen by the string of post-USMNT disappointments, Klinsmann is an ineffective coach.

By admin